This Modern Age

Posts Tagged ‘St. John’s College

Bastille Day: Outsourced French Bashing (a day late)

with 2 comments

I know, I know… There hasn’t been anything new here for days! 

Thankfully, my faithful commenters have kept lively – go take sides before I do… (I haven’t even had time to read and respond to comments). 

I’m also crushed that I missed blogging on Bastille Day.  For some great French bashing… err, I mean historical commentary, enjoy reading Jonah Goldberg on Bastille Day specifically and the French in general:

 

 

 

  1. Adhering to Al Bundy’s immortal fatwah, ‘It is good to hate the French.‘”
  2. The French Revolution was a disgusting affair of tyrannical ego, greed and power-lust, made all the worse because it took a good idea and corrupted it, like making a BMW into a low-rider.
  3. “Top Ten Reasons to Hate the French.”
  4. “Nothing did more to grant legitimacy to the idea that modern and enlightened thinking could excuse killing, razing, burning, torturing, and social leveling for utopian or “progressive” ends than the French Revolution.”
  5. “Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot, all admired the French Revolution and found within it precedents for their own contributions to world history (though most of them found the American Revolution utterly useless).”

Until I have more time on Wednesday night or Thursday…

PS – Oh, and if you are wondering about Tim Carney and/or St. John’s College (I know you’re out there), feel free to contact me – I’ll give you the low down.

Advertisements

Written by thismodernage

July 16, 2008 at 12:19 am

On Discussion & Education – Part I

leave a comment »

Discussion is the highest point of education because it is so suitable to human nature.  As wonderful a discipline as writing is, it more removed from natural human interaction than discussion.  First, writing is a complete action.  Any event or thought that is being written should be complete.  The consequence of this is that the writer cannot be involved in the daily flow of life as it happens while he is writing.  Further, no written work is perfect.  There will always be confusion about the use of particular terms, and sometimes the writer’s message may be entirely lost to the reader.  This is much less likely to be a problem in a discussion. 

In a discussion men may always ask questions to have terms and arguments clarified for him.  During a discussion mistakes may be corrected and forgiven and ideas may be explored because there is no material evidence of what is said.  This free form of learning truly lends itself to men being more active in their own education because discussion demonstrates thought and can foster and further it.  It only follows that men should become more free through discussion rather than through the removed activities of reading and writing. 

Written by thismodernage

June 26, 2008 at 8:25 am